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Girls, 10 Female Led Exhibitions To See For International Women’s Day
How about cultivating yourself with some powerful shows?
Around the Globe 03 Apr 2020

Once a year – March 8 to be precise – the world turns a spotlight onto women. We’ve been doing that everyday here at The Art Gorgeous for years, but we’re always happy to champion anything and everything that puts ladies in the spotlight. So, on the occasion of International Women’s Day 2020, we’ve rounded up a list of 10 female led exhibitions to see from across the globe that celebrate all things women!

Yumna Al Arashi: I Am Who I Am Who Am I at Anahita Contemporary

Yumna Al Arashi’s solo exhibition celebrates the power of women and diversity, the beauty of female tribes and new age sisterhood. Often blurring the power dynamics between photographer, subject, and audience, Yumna’s work asks us to question the role of each as she seamlessly weaves herself within all of these areas. In her works, Yumna’s subjects play various roles which often lead to forming a collective between women: a display of the solidarity and support that exists between them. The show runs until 21 March 2020.

Oluwole Omefemi: The Way We Were at Signature African Art

OK, so this one opens just after IWD, but we just had to include it. Oluwole Omefemi’s work focuses on the importance of hair amongst black communities, with hair standing as a metaphor for freedom. The show runs between 12 March and 2020. 

Linder Sterling: Linderism at Kettle’s Yard

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www.kettlesyard.co.uk/events/linderism/

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This exhibition of new work by Linder Sterling show includes photomontage, as well as the display of Linder as a performance artist, zine-maker, musician, documentary-photographer, collaborator, muse, guru, medium and body-builder. The show runs until 26 April 2020.

Hearts Of Our People: Native Women Artists at Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Museum

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Women have long been the creative force behind Native American art, yet their individual contributions have been largely unrecognized, instead treated as anonymous representations of entire cultures. “Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists” explores the artistic achievements of Native women and establishes their rightful place in the art world. This landmark exhibition is the first major thematic show to explore the artistic achievements of Native women. Its presentation at SAAM’s #RenwickGallery includes 82 artworks dating from antiquity to the present, made in a variety of media from textiles and beadwork, to sculpture, time-based media and photography. At the core of this exhibition is a firm belief in the power of the collaborative process. A group of exceptional Native women artists, curators, and Native art historians have come together to generate new interpretations and scholarship of this art and their makers, offering multiple points of view and perspectives to enhance and deepen understanding of the ingenuity and innovation that have always been foundational to the art of Native women. The exhibition is organized by Jill Ahlberg Yohe, associate curator of Native American Art at the Minneapolis Institute of Art and Teri Greeves, an independent curator and member of the Kiowa Nation. An advisory panel of Native women artists and Native and non-Native scholars provided insights from a range of nations. “Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists” opens at the Renwick Gallery on Friday, February 21 and runs through May 17. ????: Christi Belcourt (Michif), “The Wisdom of the Universe,” 2014, acrylic on canvas, Collection Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Purchased with funds donated by Greg Latremoille, 2014, 2014/6. © Christi Belcourt #HeartsOfOurPeople

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This landmark exhibition is the first major thematic show to explore the artistic achievements of Native women. The show includes  81 artworks dating from antiquity to the present, made in a variety of media from textiles and beadwork, to sculpture, time-based media and photography. A group of Native women artists, curators, and Native art historians have come together to generate new interpretations and scholarship of this art and their makers, offering multiple points of view and perspectives to enhance and deepen understanding of the ingenuity and innovation that have always been foundational to the art of Native women. The show runs until 17 May 2020.

Neri Oxman: Material Ecology at MoMA

Once famous for being rumoured to be dating Brad Pitt, Neri Oxman is actually an accomplished artist. In fact, she is so accomplished that she is having a solo show at MoMA. Her work thinks about materials and construction and this “material ecology” is what will be on display. The show runs until 25 May 2020.

Dora Maar at Tate Modern

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Dora Maar’s career spanned mediums, techniques and much of the 20th century. ​During the 1930s, her provocative photomontages became celebrated icons of surrealism, exploring themes such as eroticism, sleep, fantasy, fashion and the relationship between art and reality. ????️⭐???? She made work in fashion and advertising, travelled to document social conditions and made wildly inventive images. At the end of the 1930s, Maar returned to paint, and she devoted herself to painting for the rest of her life. ​ ​#DoraMaar (1907–1997) is remembered mainly for her surrealist photographs and photomontages, it is only since her death in 1997 that the full breadth of her work has begun to be recognised. Tate Modern's exhibition is the most comprehensive of Maar's work ever held. Opening with portraits made by Maar, or taken by photographers close to her, the exhibition traces her long career and the political context, professional opportunities and personal relationships that shaped her decisions at every stage. See the exhibition before 15 March 2020. Link in our bio for tickets. Members go free. ????

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Dora Maar is most famous for being lover and muse of Pablo Picasso, but she was an important artist in her own right. During the 1930s, Dora Maar’s provocative photomontages became celebrated icons of surrealism. Her eye for the unusual also translated to her commercial photography, including fashion and advertising, as well as to her social documentary projects. The show runs until 15 March 2020

Nadia Kaabi-Linke: A Matter Of Resistance at Darat Al Funun

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انضموا الينا الثلاثاء 6-8 مساء في افتتاح معرضي "مسألة صمود" و"جمل في الغرفة"، حيث تتناول الفنانة التونسية/الأوكرانية نادية كعبي-لينكي، والفنان الأردني رائد ابراهيم، في أعمالهما، حالة الهشاشة التي تستمر في بداية هذا العقد الجديد والناجمة عن بُنى سياسية، واقتصادية، واجتماعية متحوّلة Join us Tuesday 6-8 pm for the opening of A Matter of Resilience and A Camel in the Room, in which Tunisian-Ukrainian artist Nadia Kaabi-Linke and Jordanian artist Raed Ibrahim each reflect on the precariousness of shifting political, economic, and social constructs at the start of this new decade #exhibitionopening #exhibition #daratalfunun #nadiakaabilinke #kula #raedibrahim #دارة_الفنون #معرض @nadia_kaabi_linke_ @ibrahim.raed

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Nadia Kaabi-Linke’s Amman exhibition shows five different paths of dependency in times of turmoil. Her works question our relation to apparent structure of powers in a collective act of hope. The show runs until 31 July 2020.

Sarah Abu Abdallah: For The First Time In A Long Time at Jameel Art Centre

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Opening tomorrow @jameelartscentre is Sarah Abu Abdallah: 'For the First Time in a Long Time'. The exhibition brings together works produced over the last six years, creating a portrait and meditation on our media-saturated present, and the tension between our virtual personas and real lived experiences. ⁠ ⁠ A large-scale painting has also been commissioned for the exhibition, which will bring together images and forms collected from the artist’s daily encounters. An installation of living, heirloom tomatoes (pictured) stands as a monument to a type of tomato grown in Saudi Arabia that has now disappeared due to land reforms and urbanization. The exhibition runs until April 20. ⁠ ⁠ ⁠ ⁠ #ArtDubai #Dubai #ContemporaryArt #JameelArtsCentre #SarahAbuAbdallah #Installation #VirtualPersonas #MediaSaturation #UAE @sarahabuabdallah

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Working across video, painting, text and installation Sarah Abu Abdallah’s work is a meditation on our media saturated present, and the tension between our virtual personas and real lived experiences. Influenced by the vast and constant online flows of data and images as well as pop culture in the Gulf, her work is an intimate reflection on the anxieties of a hyperconnected world. The show runs until 20 April 2020.

Labor: Motherhood & Art in 2020 at New Mexico State University

The first show at New Mexico State University’s art museum, this exhibition is a conversation about how motherhood is represented in art. Featuring works by Yoko Ono, Mary Kelly and Mickalene Thomas, the exhibition asks its audience to think about the often neglected subject of being a mother when it comes to making art. The show runs until 28 May 2020

Zilia Sanchez: I Am An Island at El Museo del Barrio

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#ZILIA | “I am an island . . . The earth and the rocks are solid, but they don’t float. I like to float and feel free.” – Zilia Sánchez . . This is how artist Zilia Sánchez (b. Havana, Cuba, 1926) describes herself, expressing her desire for a solitary, uncompromising practice. The title I Am an Island appears in many of her works. It serves as a metaphor for Sánchez’s experience as an islander at once connected to and disconnected from the mainstream art currents her work engages. . . . INFO: On View NOW ‘Zilia Sánchez: Soy Isla (I Am an Island), Organized by @phillipscollection | ???? Untitled [Sin título], 1970. Serigraph,ed. 11/30, 20 x 16 in., Collection of El Museo del Barrio, New York, Gift of Servando Sacaluga, 1985.

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Cuban-born artist Zilia Sanchez has just gotten her first Museum retrospective at NYC’s El Museo del Barrio. Art icon of Puerto Rico, Zilia Sanchez has lived there since 1972. Her New York exhibition looks over seven decades of work. The show runs until 22 March 2020.

Text Lizzy Vartanian

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